Me and that burning Tower.

Me and that burning Tower.

I have been in hell ever since hearing about the disaster. I have been unable to sleep. I have upset my friends by shouting at everyone..it has been a time of desolation. Now I am beginning to understand the creative process. There,  in dreams,  something has emerged.. a large empty space. Then a woman walking to the park with her child and now. Judith( the heroine) of my last book ”Paradise Lost’ emerging at the site of the disaster sitting amongst the victims the lost and the bereaved,I understand at last what has been going on in my crazy head. When I have  feared for my sanity, felt dazed and crazed in some unimaginable horror losing control of myself and who I am and what I am becoming.

This has been the beginning of the sequel to my novel my unconscious mind has been busy and disturbed as it creates the sequel. Judith who in ‘Paradise Lost’ murdered her own alcoholic mother and gets away with it is to find her redemption amongst the survivors of the tower. She will take a survivor into her own home and she will care for this woman who has lost everything,  her child, her husband, all her cards, her clothes. This is how Judith who was so abused by her own mother will be redeemed.

So this is it- creativity can drive you crazy- whilst the story is being written at an unconscious level the conscious mind is driven away. It becomes an irrelevance, everyday activity becomes an irrelevance, friends, families, lovers are all some how disposed of as unwanted baggage.

 

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Breakthroughs and the moral imagination.

Sunset in Provence

We witness the horror of the burning tower. We learn that the cladding outside the block of flats was cheaper than the fire resistant cladding. This choice was made in the richest borough in the UK and some would say on earth.

This begs the question;

” What does one human being owe to another?’ We live now in a society which has lost religious values so what are we to replace them with? It is clear that we are unable to form our own. We have no moral imagination, we cannot conceive apparently that the rich have a duty to care for the poor, the vulnerable, the dispossessed the lonely and the sick. The rich only appear to have a duty to themselves, to their lifestyles and to their desire for more and more and more. This is at the expense of the helpless, the fragile, the afraid.

It is time I suspect for us to return to Rousseau and his masterpiece of political philosophy -‘ THE SOCIAL CONTRACT.’ Here we are asked to imagine ourselves not as individuals but as part of whole.  We are all interdependent upon each other and in the perfect society there is no separation. If that is the ‘perfect’ society then we must acknowledge that North Kensington is so far divorced from that ‘ idea of perfection than it can scarcely be imagined that any more morally bankrupt society can exist upon this earth.

Rousseau talks of the general will  ;

Each of us puts his power under the general will and as a body we receive each member as an indivisible part of the whole.’

For any society to succeed the general will must always be for the common good. This clearly not the case in North Kensington.It may be noted that when a rich person is wronged he is given the utmost attention by the authorities . However, when a poor person is wronged they have little or no recourse to either authority or justice. The poor in North Kensington have burnt to death, many children put to bed are never seen again because the cladding on the building in which they were sleeping was of the cheapest kind available. It was not fire proof. The decision to apply this cheap cladding was made by the wealthy of North Kensington.author, alcoholism, murder, matricide.

Breakthroughs and the moral imagination.

Sunset in Provence
As if a crimson blanket had been hurled across the sky

We witness the horror of the burning tower. We learn that the cladding outside the block of flats was cheaper than the fire resistant cladding. This choice was made in the richest borough in the UK and some would say on earth.

This begs the question;

” What does one human being owe to another?’ We live now in a society which has lost religious values so what are we to replace them with? It is clear that we are unable to form our own. We have no moral imagination, we cannot conceive apparently that the rich have a duty to care for the poor, the vulnerable, the dispossessed the lonely and the sick. The rich only appear to have a duty to themselves, to their lifestyles and to their desire for more and more and more. This is at the expense of the helpless, the fragile, the afraid.

It is time I suspect for us to return to Rousseau and his masterpiece of political philosophy -‘ THE SOCIAL CONTRACT.’ Here we are asked to imagine ourselves not as individuals but as part of whole.  We are all interdependent upon each other and in the perfect society there is no separation. If that is the ‘perfect’ society then we must acknowledge that North Kensington is so far divorced from that ‘ idea of perfection than it can scarcely be imagined that any more morally bankrupt society can exist upon this earth.

Rousseau talks of the general will  ;

Each of us puts his power under the general will and as a body we receive each member as an indivisible part of the whole.’

For any society to succeed the general will must always be for the common good. This clearly not the case in North Kensington.It may be noted that when a rich person is wronged he is given the utmost attention by the authorities . However, when a poor person is wronged they have little or no recourse to either authority or justice. The poor in North Kensington have burnt to death, many children put to bed are never seen again because the cladding on the building in which they were sleeping was of the cheapest kind available. It was not fire proof. The decision to apply this cheap cladding was made by the wealthy of North Kensington.author, alcoholism, murder, matricide.